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The February 2015 issue of GQ features “The Legacy Project,” a Hall of Fame portfolio of music makers who made the most noise over the past twelve months. Cover man Pharrell Williams gave access to his pop culture machine and we’ve got the highlights of what it’s like to be P inside.  Plus, J.Lo‘s official Complex cover is HOT.  Check it all inside….

In addition to 17 other artists, Pharrell is featured in the new issue of GQ as part of its Legacy Project — musicians who are leaving something behind.  And P dropped a few nuggets (as GQ followed him throughout his day for 13-hours) as to how his machine has gotten him umpteen Grammys and legacy status.

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On why he surrounds himself with women—including his two assistants, art director, and choreographer:  “I am a sensitive person, so I want to be with sensitive people.  Women have a way of expressing themselves that I can relate to more honestly.”

On his discontent over a recent T.I. record: “They did that record hoping for radio play, and they got nothing out of it.… Great, you got your No. 1 hip-hop song. But what does that do for your sales?” 

On not caring about appealing to the masses: “You want to be camouflage? Go ahead. Blend in. But we want to be that twinkle in the sky. And you might not be able to see that star now. But it’s daytime. Wait till it gets dark.”

Overheard while in Pharrell’s presence–a new Big Sean track is on the way: “Send [Big] Sean an e-mail and tell him he’s got a missile coming,” Williams tells his assistant before calling Sean himself: “It’s not what we talked about, man. But it’s haaaaard. It’s like ghost-of-Shaka-Zulu hard!”

Check out “The Voice” judge Pharrell’s full story, including his surprise appearance at Uniqlo clothing store were homeless children were given a shopping spree, over at GQ.

 

 

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You’ve seen the sneak peek, now check out Ms. Lopez serving up some sexy in her white bodysuit for the new cover of COMPLEX magazine.

The setting, her home…after dinner….in mommy mode:

Our interview takes place after dinner, in a book-lined office/study neatly crammed with all types of J.Lo memorabilia-but not before Lopez reminds her kids, twins Emme and Max, that they have school tomorrow, and have to be in bed by 8 p.m. When she finally enters, Jennifer is barefoot and looking super comfortable in ready-for-bed wear. Yes, the icon wears regular pajamas, and she looks great. Speaking with the aura of a seasoned self-help guru, she reveals how she got to this happy place.

On fairytales about relationships that little girls are taught:

Yeah, well, that’s what we’re taught when we’re little. Little girls are taught that especially. Prince Charming is gonna come along. You’re going to live happily ever after, and then that doesn’t happen. You have your first boyfriend in high school and that falls apart and you’re like, “What’s going on?” [Laughs.] All of these things get shattered one by one. It’s so unfair. Nobody teaches us the important thing from when we’re young, which is to value yourself and love yourself, and then you can share happiness and love with other people. That’s what we should be teaching kids, not fairy tales about Prince Charming rescuing you. Or that you have to be Prince Charming and rescue this girl. It’s funny, we’re formed from the time we’re 0 to 7. We’re battling the rest of our lives trying to figure that out. And now that I have my own kids, I think about that stuff a lot, like, what do I want to teach them? I want them to have fantasies and the fairy tales and all that, but at the same time I want them to know what is important, which is to have a great sense of self and to be good on their own.

On whether relationships between older women and younger men can work:

Is it possible for relationships to work when the guy is older than the girl? [Yes.] Well, then I would say yes. [Laughs.] What would be different?

On celebrity hacking being a trade off for fame/fortune:

[Laughs.] Oh! When you become rich and famous, you don’t have feelings anymore?! That’s what it is. OK! C’mon. It’s not about having money in the bank. You can have all the money in the world and it doesn’t mean you’re a happy person. Money doesn’t solve problems. It makes some things easier but it just gives you a different set of problems. Everything has a trade-off in this world. I’ve learned that from being broke as hell and having money.

On beautiful women who are insecure

It’s not just beautiful women. It’s all women. And it’s all men, too. It’s everyone. People are more surprised when they hear that somebody who is attractive is insecure. I don’t understand that because, again, we’re all human. Nobody looks in the mirror and goes, “That person is so perfect!” It’s just the nature of a human being that they have insecurities. You try to do things that you’re proud of to boost up your self-esteem and your integrity. At the end of the day, you’re the only person who can give that to you. That’s something that everybody struggles with at one time or another. I’m no different than anybody else in that sense.

On the endless rumors that have followed her through a 20 year career

The rumors at that time were so endless. I still haven’t figured that all out completely. I’ve thought sometimes, “Was it because I was a woman? Was it because I was a minority?” [Laughs.] I was like, “Why me? Why are they picking on me so much? What have I done?” It’s funny. Men get praise when they are successful, like, “Look how great he’s doing.” Women get criticized for some reason. I don’t understand it. All I know is that because I’ve stuck around for so long people realize, “Oh, that must not be true.” [Laughs.] “We finally got to know the real her.”

[The all white dressing room requests] wasn’t really a request from me. [Laughs.] You have managers and record company people saying, “It’s always dirty backstage in those little studios. Let’s make it nice for her.” And they’re attempting to make it nice because I was one of the hardest-working people at that time. I was literally working nonstop until I had a breakdown. In their attempt to [make things nice for me], they got me a reputation for asking for things like that. It used to bother me [but] I feel people know who I am now.

 

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On concerns about daughter Emme and the plastic surgery phenomenon

Yeah, what is she gonna want to do, or how good is she gonna feel about herself? I hope to show her from example that you have to love yourself for who you are. And that doesn’t mean that you can’t do things to enhance yourself, like work out, or if somebody wants to get a nose job. I don’t know. You can take a hard stance on things and then eat your words later. All I’m saying is, at the end of the day, you got to feel happy about who you are inside, and then you can make good choices for yourself.

On critics of her “Booty” video being too sexy for a mother to take part in

I’m not allowed to be sexy because I’m a mom? It’s like, How do you think I got my children? [Laughs.] The truth is I don’t want to do anything that they would be embarrassed of in the long run. But at the end of the day, they care more about me being there, taking care of them, than if I’m sexy in a video. And I’m not saying that one day they may not be like, “Mom! Why did you do that?!” [Laughs.] But I don’t think that in 10 years I’m going to be doing that either. Again, it’s about what feels good to me in this moment. It felt right. It’s a good message for women. I’m standing next to this girl who is 24 years old and I’m in my 40s and there’s no difference. Women need to see that and feel that. You can’t let the fear of what people might say or think stop you from doing what you want to do or else we would never do anything.

 

Get the “Idol” judge’s entire cover story HERE.  Her new sexy thriller The Boy Next Door hits theaters this Friday.

 

Photo credit: Pari Dukovic/GQ