Image: THE DANISH GIRL / OFFICIAL TWITTER PAGE

India’s film censorship board has barred Sony Pictures’ channel from telecasting Oscar-recognized film, The Danish Girl. 

The movie was slated to air on Sunday. However, the film authority objected to its supposedly “sensitive storyline” and dubbed it “unsuitable” for audiences below 18.

In The Danish Girl, Eddie Redmayne plays the main character grappling with his gender identity, and is based on historical events of the world’s first sex reassignment surgery.

The broadcaster tweeted: “We regret to inform you that Sony Le Plex HD is unable to telecast the television premiere of the award-winning film The Danish Girl on March 26 as the necessary certification to enable the telecast of the movie has not been received.”

“The whole subject is controversial, and it’s unsuitable to be viewed by children. It talks about a man who wants a sex change and has a genital operation to become a woman. The subject is sensitive and how do you edit a subject like that?” Mumbai Mirror a Censor Board member as saying. 

The Danish Girl won an Oscar for Alicia Vikander, who plays Redmayne’s wife, in the Best Supporting Actress category last year. 

Indians took to social media to express their disappointment.

They have called for an overhaul of the authority. 

The Danish Girl is hardly the first high-profile film to face the Censor Board’s axe.

Earlier this year, the Board removed the word “prostitute” from the 2017 Oscar-winning Iranian film The Salesman because they found it objectionable.

And back home, more recently, a film dialogue was deleted because of a weird reason.

“Mann ki baat” is a common phrase translating to “straightforward talk.” It’s also the name of prime minister Narendra Modi’s radio show.

What does the Censor Board want really?

Its own movies? Hope not!

WATCH: 5 strange film bans in other countries

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